The artist, Milos Manojlovic, born 1956 in Titel, Serbia. Graduated in Economics and Fine arts in 1980. Left Serbia in 1989 for Australia.
Lives, works, writes poems and paints (in oil and acrylics) in Melbourne, Australia.
His poetry was published in serbia and Australia. He had a short story published as a result of a writing competition at the Melbourne Fringe Festival.
He has exhibited his paintings at varying occasions:
  • ABC Art Gallery (2001 – 2004) – Solo and group exhibitions
  • Paddington Sydney (2006) – solo exhibition
  • Yarraville Gallery – solo exhibition
  • Customs Wharf Gallery, Williamstown – solo exhibition “Omni”
  • Margaret Coaxal Gallery, Williamstown- solo exhibition
  • Roar Gallery, Melbourne – group exhibition “Oil on the Road”
  • National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne- group exhibition “HYDRA – Artists from Four Continents”
  • Gabrielle Gallery, Footscray – solo exhibition “Human Silence”
  • National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (1991) – group exhibition
  • Eclectic Easel Gallery, Melbourne – group exhibition

A Word from the Art Critic

To utter the word ‘silence’ is at once to ruin silence. The sound negates the concept. As the token of its own death, it is a word that eludes us in the indeterminate poetry of it’s own absence, an absence that haunts Manojlovic’s canvas.
Whether it be through the depiction of exile, loss or merely everyday moments that seem to tremor with the knowledge that they are frozen on canvas and no where else; Manojlovic’s paintings constitute a body of work determined to come to terms with the indeterminable, the missed encounter of our own existence.
Painting is application, sculpture removal. Yet these paintings hover between the one and the other, what the brush brings forth, the knife takes away. The subject matter is neither totally reduced ‘inner’ space, nor does it resemble any notions one might hold about ‘realism’. Instead, the figurative persists (even the abstract elements in Manojlovic’s paintings have vegetal or skeletal echoes) as a question. It is as if the urban pilgrims of John Brack’s ‘Collins Street, 5 o’clock’ have broken momentarily from their common order and are now suspended in the amber of their dreams, the dust of the world still on their sleaves. There is a musical energy in Manojlovic’s work that creates an interplay of colour and outline. The lyrical play of line and pigment points to the constant force of music, which acts on organic configurations and orders them unconsciously according to unseen principles. If there are no answers to be found in these paintings that is as it should be. From music and the murmur of silence to painting and the white canvas, absence is always promise and source. The paintings of Manojlovic attest to this promise.
Nikola Gladanac
Art Critic

A Word from the Art Critic

In Miloš’ art one can easily recognise the freedom of movement and the depth of meaning. Miloš is a poet artist. His art is easily remembered and recognised. His works possess the power of poetry. They have a rare immediate appeal. Striking as his pieces are they are also thought provoking. They project this freedom of thought that resides in Miloš. His colour tones express new depths full of life energy. This trait in his art causes us to remember particular pieces for a long time. His is remembered by his works.
His works are observations and yet they mystify the ordinariness of everyday occurrences that we call life. In art, Miloš remains a poet expressing the beauty of living things as well as their scents and discourse with their surroundings. You will find that silence in his works is as moving and loud as the hustle and bustle of animated scenes. In his art, Miloš has perfected the notions of waiting and anticipation. He captures both in the depth of colour and the strength of strokes. Miloš does not portray fear, he observes and analyses the living in both past and present and so skillfully directs us towards the future. This distance projection of time, not so common in contemporary artists, is well represented in his poetry on canvas.
Miloš has increasingly drawn from his own observations of what we know as present and yet there is so much that is forcefully prophetic and inspirational in his art.
His art is good, even better than his poetry. Instincts, love, truth, silence, all interwoven with human needs and expressions. This coloured poetry through canvas, is engaging and inspirational at the same time. This exhibition is not an epic, it is vibrant and to the point. His works not only appeal, they also engage.
Voya Rajic,
Art Critic